Ad:Tech 2013

adtech

This year for Ad:Tech I did something I’ve never done before–I worked a booth in the exhibit hall. Usually I hang out in the conference rooms with big name marketers and exchange ideas with keynote speakers, and it’s rare that I have time to make it to the expo floor. However, we’re working with a very cool start-up called IMRSV that uses software to track people as they walk in front of a simple webcam and they invited me to co-curate a booth. Their technology guesses people’s age and gender in real time, and is an incredibly easy way to get metrics about people in physical space without breaking the privacy barrier. Everything is anonymous and no images are saved, only data about the number of people and type of people walking in front of the webcam. We had cameras set up all over the building and were actively quantifying the traffic of people around the show. So, going into this, I thought it was going to be cool. It was not.

Let me now give you my highly biased, subjective, and purely qualitative view of the foot traffic we got at our booth. Over the course of a day spent explaining the technology and how IPG Lab uses it, I had roughly 5 intelligent conversations. The vast majority of people I spoke with were sad, desperate, weirdos. There was the Russian spammer, the guy who runs free give-away websites, the dozens of bad email marketing, direct marketing, SEO marketing, bottom-feeder worst-of-the-worst inventory ad network sales guys, and finally, the people that were very concerned that the software was unable to automatically detect when they were flipping their middle finger at the camera, despite the fact that it did correctly guess their age and gender within seconds.

It was this pile of winners I’d like to talk about. I realized as I looked out on the teeming masses of internet assholes that I am incredibly sheltered. I forget that working at a place where we actually try to make the internet better is relatively rare compared to the huge majority of internet businesses just trying to spam, game, or otherwise make a quick buck off of the frictionless mistakes of a million accidental clickers. And, I realized that I viciously hate these people.

I guess the point to take out of all this is that as much as big media can suck at times, they’re safe. The world of media is a lot like the real world in the sense that anarchy sounds great when you’re flush and comfortable, but when the shit hits the fan and a mob is marching towards your front door, suddenly you can’t wait to find the police. I love the anarchy of the internet, the democratization of information, and the way technological disruption is keeping big media on its toes, but I have to say, days like this I’m really glad that the giants behind sites like Hulu, NYTimes, and Netflix create such cozy and safe little media havens where I can hide myself away from the masses and enjoy my media in comfort and safety.

P.S. Russian spam guy, please don’t hack my site. I know you can. You don’t have to prove anything.